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Equity, growth, and community : what the nation can learn from America's metro areas / Chris Benner and Manuel Pastor.

By: Benner, Chris [author.].
Contributor(s): Pastor, Manuel, 1956- [author.].
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookSeries: Open Access e-Books.Publisher: Oakland, California : University of California Press, [2015]Copyright date: ©2015Description: 1 online resource (xi, 350 pages) : illustrations.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 0520960041; 9780520960046.Subject(s): Since 2009 | Cities and towns -- United States -- Economic policy | Economic development projects -- United States -- Case studies | Economic development -- Social aspects -- United States | Income distribution -- United States | Regional planning -- United States -- Case studies | Development economics and emerging economies Mod Development economics and emerging economies | Economic development projects | Economic development -- Social aspects | Economic history | Economic systems and structures | Economics, finance, business and management | Economics | Einkommensverteilung | Income distribution | Regional planning | Regionalentwicklung | SOCIAL SCIENCE -- Sociology -- Urban | Society and social sciences Society and social sciences | Sociology and anthropology | Sociology | Sociology: work and labour | Wirtschaftsentwicklung | United States -- Economic conditions -- 2009- | United States | USAGenre/Form: Electronic book. | Electronic books. | Case studies.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Equity, growth, and community.DDC classification: 338.973009173/2 Online resources: Digital version
Contents:
Can't we all just get along? -- Driving that train: can closing the gap facilitate sustained growth? -- Where to go, what to ask: selecting and designing the case studies -- Parks and recreation: planning the epistemic community -- Business knows best: Elite-Driven Regional Stewardship -- Struggle and the city: conflict-informed collaboration -- The next frontier: collaboration in the new economy -- Stepping back: theorizing diverse and dynamic Epistemic communities -- Looking forward: a beloved (epistemic) community?
Summary: "In the last several years, much has been written about growing economic challenges, increasing income inequality, and political polarization in the United States. This book argues that lessons for addressing these national challenges are emerging from a new set of realities in America's metropolitan regions: first, that inequity is, in fact, bad for economic growth; second, that bringing together the concerns of equity and growth requires concerted local action; and, third, that the fundamental building block for doing this is the creation of diverse and dynamic epistemic (or knowledge) communities, which help to overcome political polarization and help regions address the challenges of economic restructuring and social divides"--Provided by publisher.
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E-books E-books
http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1525/j.ctt1ffjnd4 Not for loan Only accessible on campus.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Can't we all just get along? -- Driving that train: can closing the gap facilitate sustained growth? -- Where to go, what to ask: selecting and designing the case studies -- Parks and recreation: planning the epistemic community -- Business knows best: Elite-Driven Regional Stewardship -- Struggle and the city: conflict-informed collaboration -- The next frontier: collaboration in the new economy -- Stepping back: theorizing diverse and dynamic Epistemic communities -- Looking forward: a beloved (epistemic) community?

"In the last several years, much has been written about growing economic challenges, increasing income inequality, and political polarization in the United States. This book argues that lessons for addressing these national challenges are emerging from a new set of realities in America's metropolitan regions: first, that inequity is, in fact, bad for economic growth; second, that bringing together the concerns of equity and growth requires concerted local action; and, third, that the fundamental building block for doing this is the creation of diverse and dynamic epistemic (or knowledge) communities, which help to overcome political polarization and help regions address the challenges of economic restructuring and social divides"--Provided by publisher.

English.

Online resource; title from PDF title page (Luminos, viewed October 29, 2015).

JSTOR Books at JSTOR Open Access

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