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Providing for the casualties of war : the American experience through World War II / Bernard Rostker.

By: Rostker, Bernard [author.].
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookSeries: Rand Corporation monograph series: MG-1164-OSD.Publisher: Santa Monica, CA : RAND, 2013Copyright date: ©2013Description: 1 online resource (xix, 286 pages).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 0833078194; 0833078216; 9780833078193; 9780833078216.Report number: MG-1164-OSDSubject(s): Battle casualties -- Medical care -- History | Medicine, Military -- History | Veterans -- Medical care -- History | War casualties -- Medical care -- History | Delivery of Health Care | Disciplines and Occupations | Disease | Health Occupations | Health | Medicine | Military Medicine | Military Personnel | Named Groups | Occupational Groups | Persons | Population Characteristics | Veterans Health | Wounds and Injuries | HISTORY -- Military -- Biological & Chemical Warfare | HISTORY -- Military -- Veterans | Medicine, Military | Veterans -- Medical careGenre/Form: Electronic book. | Electronic books. | History.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Providing for the casualties of war.DDC classification: 355.3/450973 Online resources: Digital version
Contents:
Introduction : looking to the past for lessons ... to apply in the future -- Evolution of the European system of providing for casualties : Greece, Rome, the Middle Ages, and the Renaissance -- Evolution of the European system of providing for casualties in the Age of Enlightenment : France and Britain as the antecedents of the American system of care -- The American system of providing for the wounded evolves -- The Civil War -- From the Civil War to the World War -- The World War -- World War II -- Summary : What happened?---What have we learned?---How did we get here?
Summary: War has always been a dangerous business, bringing injury, wounds, and death, and -- until recently -- often disease. What has changed over time, most dramatically in the last 150 or so years, is the care these casualties receive and who provides it. Medical services have become highly organized and are state sponsored. Diseases are now prevented through vaccination and good sanitation. Sedation now ameliorates pain, and antibiotics combat infection. Wounds that once meant amputation or death no longer do so. Transfers from the field to more-capable hospitals are now as swift as aircraft can make them. The mental consequences of war are now seen as genuine illnesses and treated accordingly, rather than punished to the extreme. Likewise, treatment of those disabled by war and of veterans generally has changed markedly -- along with who supplies these and other benefits. This book looks at the history of how humanity has cared for its war casualties, from ancient times through the aftermath of World War II. For each historical period, the author examines the care the sick and wounded received in the field and in hospitals, the care given to the disabled veteran and his dependents, and who provided that care and how. He shows how the lessons of history have informed the American experience over time. Finally, the author sums up this history thematically, focusing on changes in the nature and treatment of injuries, organization of services on and off the battlefield, the role of the state in providing care, and the invisible wounds of war.
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http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.7249/j.ctt2tt90p Not for loan Only accessible on campus.

Print version cataloged as a monographic set by Library of Congress.

Includes bibliographical references.

Introduction : looking to the past for lessons ... to apply in the future -- Evolution of the European system of providing for casualties : Greece, Rome, the Middle Ages, and the Renaissance -- Evolution of the European system of providing for casualties in the Age of Enlightenment : France and Britain as the antecedents of the American system of care -- The American system of providing for the wounded evolves -- The Civil War -- From the Civil War to the World War -- The World War -- World War II -- Summary : What happened?---What have we learned?---How did we get here?

War has always been a dangerous business, bringing injury, wounds, and death, and -- until recently -- often disease. What has changed over time, most dramatically in the last 150 or so years, is the care these casualties receive and who provides it. Medical services have become highly organized and are state sponsored. Diseases are now prevented through vaccination and good sanitation. Sedation now ameliorates pain, and antibiotics combat infection. Wounds that once meant amputation or death no longer do so. Transfers from the field to more-capable hospitals are now as swift as aircraft can make them. The mental consequences of war are now seen as genuine illnesses and treated accordingly, rather than punished to the extreme. Likewise, treatment of those disabled by war and of veterans generally has changed markedly -- along with who supplies these and other benefits. This book looks at the history of how humanity has cared for its war casualties, from ancient times through the aftermath of World War II. For each historical period, the author examines the care the sick and wounded received in the field and in hospitals, the care given to the disabled veteran and his dependents, and who provided that care and how. He shows how the lessons of history have informed the American experience over time. Finally, the author sums up this history thematically, focusing on changes in the nature and treatment of injuries, organization of services on and off the battlefield, the role of the state in providing care, and the invisible wounds of war.

Online resource; title from digital title page (viewed on October 1, 2013).

JSTOR Books at JSTOR Open Access

Other editions of this work

Providing for the casualties of war : by Rostker, Bernard,
Providing for the casualties of war : by Rostker, Bernard,
Providing for the casualties of war : by Rostker, Bernard,

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