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The most dreadful visitation : male madness in Victorian fiction / Valerie Pedlar.

By: Pedlar, Valerie [author.].
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookSeries: Liverpool English texts and studies: 46.Publisher: Liverpool : Liverpool University Press, [2006]Copyright date: ©2006Description: 1 online resource (182 pages).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 1781387737; 1846314186; 9781781387733; 9781846314186.Subject(s): 1800-1899 | English fiction -- 19th century -- History and criticism | Men in literature | Men -- Mental health | Mental illness in literature | History, 19th Century | History, Modern 1601- | History | Humanities | Literature | Medicine in Literature | Men | Mental Disorders | Named Groups | Persons | Psychiatry and Psychology | Clinical psychology | Crime and mystery | English fiction | Fiction and related items | Historical mysteries | LITERARY CRITICISM -- European -- English, Irish, Scottish, Welsh | Medicine | Men in literature | Men -- Mental health | Mental illness in literature | Other branches of medicine | Medicine in Literature -- Great Britain | Medicine in Literature | Mental Disorders -- history | Mental Disorders -- Great Britain -- History | History, 19th Century -- Great Britain | History, 19th Century | Men -- psychology -- Great Britain | Men -- psychology | United Kingdom | Multi-UserGenre/Form: Electronic book. | Electronic books. | Criticism, interpretation, etc.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Most dreadful visitation.DDC classification: 823.8093561 Online resources: Digital version
Contents:
Insurrection and imagination : idiocy and Barnaby Rudge -- Thwarted lovers : Basil and Maud -- Wrongful confinement, sensationalism and Hard cash -- Madness and marriage -- The zoophagus maniac : madness and degeneracy in Dracula.
Action note: digitized 2010 committed to preserveSummary: "Victorian literature is rife with scenes of madness, with mental disorder functioning as everything from a simple plot device to a commentary on the foundations of Victorian society. But while madness in Victorian fiction has been much studied, most scholarship has focused on the portrayal of madness in women; male mental disorder in the period has suffered comparative neglect. This book corrects this imbalance by exploring a wide range of Victorian writings to consider the relationship between the portrayal of mental illness in literary works and the portrayal of similar disorders in the writings of doctors and psychologists. The book presents in-depth studies of Dickens' Barnaby Rudge, Tennyson's Maud, Wilkie Collins' Basil and Trollope's He Knew He Was Right, considering each work in the context of Victorian understandings -- and fears -- of mental degeneracy."--Publisher's description.
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http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctt5vjmzb Not for loan Only accessible on campus.

Includes bibliographical references (pages 163-177) and index.

Insurrection and imagination : idiocy and Barnaby Rudge -- Thwarted lovers : Basil and Maud -- Wrongful confinement, sensationalism and Hard cash -- Madness and marriage -- The zoophagus maniac : madness and degeneracy in Dracula.

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"Victorian literature is rife with scenes of madness, with mental disorder functioning as everything from a simple plot device to a commentary on the foundations of Victorian society. But while madness in Victorian fiction has been much studied, most scholarship has focused on the portrayal of madness in women; male mental disorder in the period has suffered comparative neglect. This book corrects this imbalance by exploring a wide range of Victorian writings to consider the relationship between the portrayal of mental illness in literary works and the portrayal of similar disorders in the writings of doctors and psychologists. The book presents in-depth studies of Dickens' Barnaby Rudge, Tennyson's Maud, Wilkie Collins' Basil and Trollope's He Knew He Was Right, considering each work in the context of Victorian understandings -- and fears -- of mental degeneracy."--Publisher's description.

Electronic reproduction. [Place of publication not identified] : HathiTrust Digital Library, 2010. MiAaHDL

Master and use copy. Digital master created according to Benchmark for Faithful Digital Reproductions of Monographs and Serials, Version 1. Digital Library Federation, December 2002. MiAaHDL

http://purl.oclc.org/DLF/benchrepro0212

English.

digitized 2010 HathiTrust Digital Library committed to preserve pda MiAaHDL

Online resource; title from PDF title page (OAPEN; viewed July 19, 2016).

JSTOR Books at JSTOR Open Access

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The most dreadful visitation : by Pedlar, Valerie,
The most dreadful visitation : by Pedlar, Valerie,

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