Normal view MARC view ISBD view

The economic burden of providing health insurance : how much worse off are small firms? / Christine Eibner.

By: Eibner, Christine.
Contributor(s): Institute for Civil Justice (U.S.) | Kauffman-RAND Institute for Entrepreneurship Public Policy.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookSeries: Technical report (Rand Corporation): TR-559-EMKF.Publisher: Santa Monica, CA : RAND Corp., 2008Description: 1 online resource (xvii, 62 pages) : illustrations.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 0833045024; 0833047825; 9780833045027; 9780833047823.Report number: TR-559-EMKFSubject(s): Employer-sponsored health insurance -- United States -- Costs | Small business -- Employees -- Medical care -- United States -- Costs | Americas | Anthropology, Education, Sociology and Social Phenomena | Costs and Cost Analysis | Delivery of Health Care | Economics | Financing, Organized | Geographic Locations | Geographicals | Health Benefit Plans, Employee | Health Care Costs | Health Care Economics and Organizations | Health Care Quality, Access, and Evaluation | Health Expenditures | Health Services Administration | Income | Insurance, Health | Insurance | North America | Organization and Administration | Personnel Management | Population Characteristics | Quality of Health Care | Salaries and Fringe Benefits | Social Sciences | Socioeconomic Factors | United States | BUSINESS & ECONOMICS -- Labor | Health Insurance and Medicare Legislation - U.S | Law - U.S | Law, Politics & Government | MEDICAL -- Health Policy | POLITICAL SCIENCE -- Labor & Industrial Relations | United StatesGenre/Form: Electronic book. | Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Economic burden of providing health insurance.DDC classification: 331.25/540973 Online resources: Digital version
Contents:
Ch. 1. Introduction -- ch. 2. Data -- ch. 3. Methods -- ch. 4. Results -- ch. 5. Limitations -- ch. 6. Discussion -- ch. 7. Conclusion -- Appendix A. Supporting data.
Cover; Preface; Contents; Figures; Tables; Summary; Acknowledgments; Abbreviations; Chapter One -- Introduction; Background; Motivation; Approach; Overview of This Report; Chapter Two -- Data; Chapter Three -- Methods; Chapter Four -- Results; Employer Health-Insurance Burdens; Sensitivity Analyses With Very Small Firms; Plan Quality; Chapter Five -- Limitations; Chapter Six -- Discussion; Overall Results; Growth in Health-Insurance Burden at Small Firms; Differences Between Small and Large Firms; Distribution of Health-Insurance Burden Among Offering Firms; Components of Employer Cost Burden.
Summary: More than 60 percent of nonelderly Americans receive health-insurance (HI) coverage through employers, either as policyholders or as dependents. However, rising health-care costs are leading many to question the long-term viability of the employer-based insurance system. Concerns about the economic burden of providing HI are particularly acute for small businesses, which are both less likely than larger firms to offer HI and more sensitive to price when deciding to offer insurance. Small firms may have difficulty containing costs due to their limited bargaining power and their inability to hir.
    average rating: 0.0 (0 votes)
Item type Current location Call number URL Status Notes Date due Barcode
E-books E-books
http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.7249/tr559emkf Not for loan Only accessible on campus.

"This research was conducted within the Kauffman-Rand Institute for Entrepreneurship Public Policy in the Rand Institute for Civil Justice"--Preface.

Includes bibliographical references (pages 59-62).

Ch. 1. Introduction -- ch. 2. Data -- ch. 3. Methods -- ch. 4. Results -- ch. 5. Limitations -- ch. 6. Discussion -- ch. 7. Conclusion -- Appendix A. Supporting data.

Cover; Preface; Contents; Figures; Tables; Summary; Acknowledgments; Abbreviations; Chapter One -- Introduction; Background; Motivation; Approach; Overview of This Report; Chapter Two -- Data; Chapter Three -- Methods; Chapter Four -- Results; Employer Health-Insurance Burdens; Sensitivity Analyses With Very Small Firms; Plan Quality; Chapter Five -- Limitations; Chapter Six -- Discussion; Overall Results; Growth in Health-Insurance Burden at Small Firms; Differences Between Small and Large Firms; Distribution of Health-Insurance Burden Among Offering Firms; Components of Employer Cost Burden.

More than 60 percent of nonelderly Americans receive health-insurance (HI) coverage through employers, either as policyholders or as dependents. However, rising health-care costs are leading many to question the long-term viability of the employer-based insurance system. Concerns about the economic burden of providing HI are particularly acute for small businesses, which are both less likely than larger firms to offer HI and more sensitive to price when deciding to offer insurance. Small firms may have difficulty containing costs due to their limited bargaining power and their inability to hir.

JSTOR Books at JSTOR Open Access

Powered by Koha