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Organizing state and local health departments for public health preparedness / Jeffrey Wasserman [and others].

Contributor(s): Jacobson, Peter D | Lurie, Nicole | Nelson, Christopher | Nelson, Martha I | Ricci, Karen | Shea, Molly | Wasserman, Jeffrey | Zazzali, James | United States. Department of Health and Human Services | Center for Domestic and International Health Security | Rand Corporation | RAND Health.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookSeries: Technical report (Rand Corporation): Publisher: Santa Monica, CA : RAND, 2006Description: 1 online resource.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 083306004X; 9780833060044.Subject(s): Crisis management -- Health aspects | Disaster medicine -- United States -- Evaluation | Emergency management -- United States -- Evaluation | Hospitals -- Administration -- Planning | Preparedness | Public health administration -- United States | Public health -- United States -- Evaluation | Emergency management -- Evaluation | Hospitals -- Administration -- Planning | Preparedness | Public health administration | Public health -- Evaluation | Social Sciences | Social Welfare & Social Work - General | Social Welfare & Social Work | Public Health Administration | Delivery of Health Care -- organization & administration | Disaster Planning -- organization & administration | Local Government | State Government | United States | United StatesGenre/Form: Technical Report. | Electronic books.DDC classification: 363.3480973 Online resources: Digital version
Contents:
Introduction -- Analytic approach -- Results -- Summary and conclusions -- Appendix A: CDC progress report indicators (2004) -- Appendix B: Public health laboratories' survey questions used in analysis -- Appendix C: Robust regression with centralization-regionalization interactions.
Summary: Improving the ability to respond to bioterrorism and other emergencies is an important challenge facing the U.S. public health system. Despite having a knowledgeable workforce, practice and experience, capacity, and partnerships with other responders in the community, the system₂s ability to respond may depend largely on its structure. This study examines a key question: Are state and local public health agencies related to one another in a way that facilitates emergency response? Specific objectives of this study are to explain the factors influencing the particular ways in which state and local public health systems are organized, how the various types of relationships that exist between state and local public health departments have been arrived at, and, most important, the consequences of such structures and relationships for emergency preparedness. We also examine alternative structures from several different types of service industries (public education, banking, the welfare system, and port authorities). Finally, we recommend concrete strategies to improve public health preparedness. This report will be of interest to policymakers and to public health professionals at the state and local levels who are involved in bioterrorism response and emergency preparedness, as well as to other agencies involved in emergency response.
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http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.7249/tr318dhhs Not for loan Only accessible on campus.

Includes bibliographical references.

Introduction -- Analytic approach -- Results -- Summary and conclusions -- Appendix A: CDC progress report indicators (2004) -- Appendix B: Public health laboratories' survey questions used in analysis -- Appendix C: Robust regression with centralization-regionalization interactions.

Improving the ability to respond to bioterrorism and other emergencies is an important challenge facing the U.S. public health system. Despite having a knowledgeable workforce, practice and experience, capacity, and partnerships with other responders in the community, the system₂s ability to respond may depend largely on its structure. This study examines a key question: Are state and local public health agencies related to one another in a way that facilitates emergency response? Specific objectives of this study are to explain the factors influencing the particular ways in which state and local public health systems are organized, how the various types of relationships that exist between state and local public health departments have been arrived at, and, most important, the consequences of such structures and relationships for emergency preparedness. We also examine alternative structures from several different types of service industries (public education, banking, the welfare system, and port authorities). Finally, we recommend concrete strategies to improve public health preparedness. This report will be of interest to policymakers and to public health professionals at the state and local levels who are involved in bioterrorism response and emergency preparedness, as well as to other agencies involved in emergency response.

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